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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    HDD backup problem

    I have regularly used file history to backup my 500MB c: drive to 1TB E: drive. I used system image to backup C; to G; a removeable HDD. I cloned a new 1TB drive and replaced the 500MB C: drive with it. It would not boot. I used my Win 10 repair CD to fix the boot problem. All looked well. Windows did a big update about this time. I decided to do a backup while everything was working. Windows 10 system image insists I must include C: and E: in the backup requiring a 2TB drive which I do not have. There are no applications starting on E: Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thank you.
    Last edited by rnwells; 2018-05-31 at 15:15.

  2. #2
    New Lounger
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    It seems you are using the Windows built in backup utility. This is a hangover from Windows 7 and most users would suggest using free Macrium Reflect for images (and cloning).
    It would also seem that your boot files must be on D: which is why the backup wants to include this drive.
    You can change the boot drive to C: or using Macrium, just choose to backup C: and leave D: out of the backup.

  3. #3
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    A screen shot from Disk Management would help us determine why you need C and D in the backup.
    Search for "Disk Management" and look for "Create and format disk partitions".

    cheers, Paul

  4. #4
    New Lounger
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  5. #5
    Gold Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    You have given an alphabet soup of drives please recheck and note the center bar of disk manager can be dragged up to show more drives in the bottom 1/2 of the screen.
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  6. #6
    5 Star Lounger RockE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wavy View Post
    You have given an alphabet soup of drives please recheck and note the center bar of disk manager can be dragged up to show more drives in the bottom 1/2 of the screen.
    Like wavy implied, where is this D: drive of which you spoke?
    Clone or Image often! Backup, backup, backup, backup...
    - - - - -
    Home Built System: Windows 10 Home 64-bit, AMD Athlon II X3 435 CPU, 16GB DDR3 RAM, ASUSTeK M4A89GTD-PRO/USB3 (AM3) motherboard, 512GB SanDisk SSD, 3 TB WD HDD, 1024MB ATI AMD RADEON HD 6450 video, ASUS VE278 (1920x1080) display, ATAPI iHAS224 Optical Drive, integrated Realtek High Definition Audio

  7. #7
    New Lounger
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    Sorry for any confusion. My only harddrives are C: and E:.

  8. #8
    5 Star Lounger RockE's Avatar
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    Disk Management indicates that your E: drive is "System". A more 'normal' situation is that C: would be "System, Boot, Page File, Active, Crash Dump, Primary Partition" (while E: might simply be shown as a healthy "Primary Partition").

    EDIT: Some other Lounger should pop in here with an explanation and procedure fairly soon.
    Clone or Image often! Backup, backup, backup, backup...
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    Home Built System: Windows 10 Home 64-bit, AMD Athlon II X3 435 CPU, 16GB DDR3 RAM, ASUSTeK M4A89GTD-PRO/USB3 (AM3) motherboard, 512GB SanDisk SSD, 3 TB WD HDD, 1024MB ATI AMD RADEON HD 6450 video, ASUS VE278 (1920x1080) display, ATAPI iHAS224 Optical Drive, integrated Realtek High Definition Audio

  9. #9
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Open an elevated Command Prompt, type

    diskpart

    and hit Enter. Type

    list disk

    and hit Enter. Type

    sel disk 0

    and hit Enter. Type

    list partition

    and hit Enter. Type

    sel disk 1

    and hit Enter. Type

    list partition

    and hit Enter. Take a snip of all that and post it here.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  10. #10
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    You need both disks in your backup because one boots and the other runs Windows. As RockE said, this is not normal and it's asking for trouble with future restore / clones.
    Ideally, Disk 0 would be C: and have all boot and Windows files, along with your data. You might have an additional disk for large amounts of static data like pictures, but it would not be "active", boot or system.

    I suggest you work out which disk you are going to use for Windows, remove the other disk, reboot and repair Windows - after making a backup (catch 22). Maybe you can put the old disk back in and send us a Disk Manager shot so we can see what you used to have.

    cheers, Paul

  11. #11
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    As a side note, your C: drive is getting quite full, and you should consider if there is Stuff that can be moved to the E: drive...
    BATcher

    Always advise against annoying, awkward and affected alliteration.

  12. #12
    New Lounger
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    Disk Part info

    Attached is requested infoDskMgt.jpg

  13. #13
    New Lounger
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  14. #14
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Please follow the instruction in post #9. That information will be helpful in solving your dilemma.

    :: I see that you did while I was typing this. Thanks ::
    Last edited by bbearren; 2018-06-02 at 14:07. Reason: addendum
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  15. #15
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Open an elevated Command Prompt, then diskpart. After the DISKPART prompt loads, type

    list disk

    and hit Enter. Type

    sel disk 1

    and hit Enter. Now type

    sel partition 1

    and hit Enter. type

    inactive

    and hit Enter. You may get a warning that your computer may not boot. Go ahead and hit Enter.

    now exit diskpart, then exit the Command Prompt, and restart your computer.

    If it fails to boot, go through the same procedure you used before to get it to boot. Once you have booted into Windows, open Disk Management and post a snip like that in post #12.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

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