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  1. #16
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    Thanks for your detailed instructions.
    I now have it updating daily without having to remember to go to windows update.
    Don't know why Microsoft didn't include this process as part of the program.

    A friend and I run a Win8 SIG in our local Users Group and I'll make sure this gets to my group

    Ernie

  2. #17
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    I, too, appreciate the detailed instructions. My question is, for those of us who hibernate overnight or when not using the computer, why would we want to wake the computer to do this, if we have checked the box telling Task Scheduler to run the task ASAP if missed? As far as I know, Windows won't shut the computer off again after completing the scheduled task.

    Thanks in advance.

  3. #18
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by readera View Post
    I, too, appreciate the detailed instructions. My question is, for those of us who hibernate overnight or when not using the computer, why would we want to wake the computer to do this, if we have checked the box telling Task Scheduler to run the task ASAP if missed?
    You don't have to. The instructions are a general guideline for setting up the task. Set the Conditions to suit your own needs.

    Quote Originally Posted by readera View Post
    As far as I know, Windows won't shut the computer off again after completing the scheduled task.
    It is my understanding that Windows returns to its previous power state once a scheduled task is completed. I'll have to double-check this for confirmation.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  4. #19
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    It is my understanding that Windows returns to its previous power state once a scheduled task is completed. I'll have to double-check this for confirmation.
    I edited one of my scheduled tasks for "Wake" and tried "Sleep" last night to see the result. My PC was awake this morning, meaning it didn't return to "Sleep" after the task ran. I haven't tried "Hibernate" yet.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    It is my understanding that Windows returns to its previous power state once a scheduled task is completed. I'll have to double-check this for confirmation.
    I perform a lot of database backups through scheduled tasks. These tasks wake up my desktop from sleep. I have been doing it for years and I have never seen Windows going back to "sleep" mode.
    Rui
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  6. #21
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Funny how sometimes the simple solutions can be elusive. To get the PC to go back to sleep after completing the task which awakened it, go to Control Panel > Power Options and on the left side click on "Change when the computer sleeps". I used 20 minutes to test my hypothesis.

    Works like a charm. I put the PC to sleep, Task Scheduler awakened it to update the Windows Defender Signatures, and the PC put itself back to sleep.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  7. #22
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    For those wanting to improve (somewhat) on Windows Defender in Windows 8 on x86/x64 (not ARM or RT version), Avast Free Edition works well for me. Except that it does slow down Chrome page loads, especially secure sites. And it can slow initial launching of a user account.

    While researching, I found that Avast got better detection and removal ratings than Windows Defender. I have used Avast in Windows 8 Pro successfully for several months now. Updating Avast is automatic, and totally independent of Windows Updates.

    I have Microsoft Updates set up to only notify me when new updates are available. Then I decide what and when to update (see Susan Bradley's Patch Watch Column for guidance). I've been burned by Automatic Updates too many times to let Microsoft decide how to update my computers.
    -- Bob Primak --

  8. #23
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    I also have Windows Update set for notify only, but I usually install all updates. I just don't want Windows to ask me to reboot when I'm in the middle of something.

    As for Windows Defender, I've used MSE in Windows 7 and Windows Defender in Windows 8 Pro exclusively for real time protection, with an occasional Malwarebytes scan, and I've not had any problems. Of course, we all have our favorites and our own reasons for doing the things we do the way we do them.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    [FONT=Georgia][SIZE=3]I just don't want Windows to ask me to reboot when I'm in the middle of something.
    Windows 8 will only do that once a month, then give you three days to get around to it, followed by a 15 minute warning:

    Minimizing restarts after automatic updating in Windows Update

    Bruce

  10. #25
    Administrator jwitalka's Avatar
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    I'm with bbearren. I have Windows set to notify simply to control when the updates are installed. I always install them and have never had a problem. As I said in another post, a failed Windows Update is usually (I've learned never to say always) caused by some form of corruption in the OS that I prefer to fix. A prime example is the .net update failures caused by a corrupted installation of .net.

    Jerry

  11. #26
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceR View Post
    Windows 8 will only do that once a month, then give you three days to get around to it, followed by a 15 minute warning:
    My point is that I don't want it to do that at all, regardless of the time frame.
    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    we all have ... our own reasons for doing the things we do the way we do them.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  12. #27
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwitalka View Post
    I'm with bbearren. I have Windows set to notify simply to control when the updates are installed. I always install them and have never had a problem. As I said in another post, a failed Windows Update is usually (I've learned never to say always) caused by some form of corruption in the OS that I prefer to fix. A prime example is the .net update failures caused by a corrupted installation of .net.

    Jerry
    I disagree.

    You only have to look over the past six months of AskWoody.com or Susan Bradley's Patch Watch Column to see widespread issues with a few MS Updates. I had a few of these issues myself, and there was no obvious system corruption or third-party security conflict. Sometimes there's an OEM System File which should not be altered due to manufacturer hardware issues. Sometimes it's a driver conflict. Other times MS sends a patch down the chute which should be regarded as optional, but it would install automatically if the settings are that way. One recent Windows 7 Platform Upgrade wrecked a lot of perfectly good systems with particular graphics setups before it was withdrawn. With MS Updates burrowing deeper and deeper into the System Kernel these days, anything can happen, even in a perfect, pristine system.

    With a few experts watching for significant patching issues, I am able to avoid being one of the "pioneers" who keep getting the arrows in their backs. But I do thank those who take every update as it is offered -- without you folks, I'd never know which patches to postpone or skip. To those who have never had a Windows patch go wrong I say, you are luckier folks than I am!
    Last edited by bobprimak; 2013-07-05 at 03:24.
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  13. #28
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobprimak View Post
    But I do thank those who take every update as it is offered -- without you folks, I'd never know which patches to postpone or skip. To those who have never had a Windows patch go wrong I say, you are luckier folks than I am!
    No need to thank me, Bob. Since I've had no trouble with any update, I can't have made any contributions on that front. The updates have all worked for me.

    Which is not to say that Susan's column is of little use; she performs a great service for those who must look after a number of machines, not just their own. But I perform routine drive imaging, and have no fear of fouling something up that I can't quickly undo.

    Of course that's my main reason for drive imaging; the ability to fully recover from any calamity. That's also the reason so many of us encourage everyone to separate their data from their system via partitioning, and to get into a routine regimen/habit of backing up both system and data.
    Last edited by bbearren; 2013-07-05 at 09:25.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  14. #29
    Administrator jwitalka's Avatar
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    Couldn't have said it better Bbearen. There's nothing wrong with Bob's methodology. Fred and Dr Who don't apply any updates and it seems to work for them.

    My own personal opinion is that Microsoft issues critical Windows Updates for a reason and I want to apply them as soon as possible. As I've stated, I've never had a problem but if I did, a simple System Restore or if that fails, an image restore would get me back to where I started.

    When I get a PC to work on, the first thing I do is to create an image backup. Then I do a malware scan followed by Windows Update. I have seen failures in this case but its always caused by system corruption that I fix. i think my clients are best served by a system that is completely up to date with Microsoft Updates.

    Jerry

  15. #30
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    No need to thank me, Bob. Since I've had no trouble with any update, I can't have made any contributions on that front. The updates have all worked for me.

    Which is not to say that Susan's column is of little use; she performs a great service for those who must look after a number of machines, not just their own. But I perform routine drive imaging, and have no fear of fouling something up that I can't quickly undo.

    Of course that's my main reason for drive imaging; the ability to fully recover from any calamity. That's also the reason so many of us encourage everyone to separate their data from their system via partitioning, and to get into a routine regimen/habit of backing up both system and data.

    Quote Originally Posted by jwitalka View Post
    Couldn't have said it better Bbearen. There's nothing wrong with Bob's methodology. Fred and Dr Who don't apply any updates and it seems to work for them.

    My own personal opinion is that Microsoft issues critical Windows Updates for a reason and I want to apply them as soon as possible. As I've stated, I've never had a problem but if I did, a simple System Restore or if that fails, an image restore would get me back to where I started.

    When I get a PC to work on, the first thing I do is to create an image backup. Then I do a malware scan followed by Windows Update. I have seen failures in this case but its always caused by system corruption that I fix. i think my clients are best served by a system that is completely up to date with Microsoft Updates.

    Jerry
    We all have our preferred ways of dealing with Microsoft (or any) updates.

    Drive Imaging is a first priority with me also. But I find it's better and less of a hassle to avoid bad patches in the first place than to recover from them later.

    Postponing even most of the most "critical" of Microsoft's recent patches has not resulted in any infections or instabilities on any of my Windows installations, as long as I apply each month's patches before the next Patch Tuesday comes out.

    Woody's approach works the best for me. Susan's recommendations can leave patches not applied for many months, and unless you're a System Administrator or something like that, this seems to me to be too long to wait. There's also the risk of great confusion when Susan finally gives the Install recommendation to some long-forgotten KB Number.

    As I say, what works for one does not always work for all. Each of us should patch as we feel comfortable, and only hold off if we feel we know enough and are going to be vigilant enough to eventually apply all necessary Microsoft patches.

    As one who has had more than a few issues with MS patches, I recommend waiting for the all-clear from my trusted sources. While no one else needs to follow my advice, that is where I stand on patching.

    Unlike some Lounge members, I am not confident enough in my own skills to avoid all patching altogether. In fact, when Windows XP ends security updates, I will retire my own Windows XP computer in all likelihood, saving the hard drive (in an enclosure) only for data recovery when and if it may ever be needed.
    Last edited by bobprimak; 2013-07-11 at 15:07.
    -- Bob Primak --

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