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  1. #1
    3 Star Lounger
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    Powerpoint format

    Mydaughter submitted a powerpoint presentation file to a U.K.conference organiser, covering a presentation she was booked todeliver, but it was rejected because it was not of the “correctformat” - it should have been 16:9 instead of 4:3. Re-doing thepresentation involved a lot of work as just “stretching” theslides would have looked odd. Is there a standard to which all suchpresentations should adhere or were the organisers just beingpedantic, and if so, is that standard 16:9?

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    WS Lounge VIP access-mdb's Avatar
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    As far as I'm aware there's no universal standard. However, any organisation may well have a standard. The question is, was your daughter told of the requirements (which may well include other things than the format)? They may well have 16:9 projectors, but other organisations only 4:3 ones (I have to be careful as organisations I belong to have different format projectors.

    I've got Office 16 and that can be changed from wide to standard easily and asks if the images are to be resized or truncated. It wasn't a problem on one PowerPoint I tested it on, but it was on another.
    What do you mean nothing is impossible? I've been doing nothing for years.

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    2 Star Lounger -Moonshine-'s Avatar
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    Modern PowerPoint applications, PP 2013/2016, use Widescreen(16:9) slides by default which perhaps is a reflection of the viewing screens that we use in this day and age.
    TVs, Smart TVs, LCDs, new projectors, modern boardroom projectors, Microsoft Surface devices and online platforms like YouTube or Vimeo all use Widescreen.
    I suppose, before you’re going to create a presentation, you should try and find out what is required in terms of size if the presentation is to be shown somewhere that you’re not familiar with. Some might still use older equipment suitable for 4:3 but they are a little old fashioned these days.

    If you knew your presentation was to be viewed on say a tablet, then the size needs to considered also as different tablets use different ratios.

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    Thanks for the useful information - I will pass it on to my daughter

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    The aspect ratio of 4:3 comes from broadcast TV, and goes way, way back into deep television history. Movies often used a wider format though and multiple aspect ratios were used there (CinemaScope, etc.).

    When High Definition TV was created they settled on the 16:9 aspect ratio, which of course is a wide screen format. Since then 16:9 has comfortably settled into being the "default" wide screen format.

    Here's the thing though. No one tries to create one aspect ratio, or resolution, for everything anymore. Many aspect ratios are used and many resolutions are used too. The techniques for mapping an image at one aspect ratio, to a screen/display at a different aspect ratio, are well-known and widely used. Letterboxing and Pan-And-Scan are a couple such.

    Here's the thing. If your daughter's 4:3 presentation was displayed on a widescreen display, it would result in unused vertical bars on either side of the presentation. And, aside from the unused screen space, what exactly is the problem with that? Unless you have lived under a rock for the last 20 years then everyone has seen that before.

    I'd count this as pedantic. You might as well try to set presentation standards for the colours of presenter's clothes, or laser pointers.

  8. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by BHarder View Post
    I'd count this as pedantic. You might as well try to set presentation standards for the colours of presenter's clothes, or laser pointers.
    I'd agree with that. Moreover, if the presentation is going to be projected, then the obvious choices are:

    a 4:3 presentation on a 16:9 capable projector, so blanks areas to the sides which no-one should mind, or
    a 16:9 presentation on a 4:3 projector, which results in a much reduced image (which I for one would mind).

    Until everyone has a modern projector, it seems best to cater nicely for the old kit, and use 4:3 (from someone who projects for an arts society on an old projector).

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