Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    4 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    514
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 54 Times in 48 Posts

    Windows 8.1 problems vs. Windows 10 problems - Winner is 8.1

    We have several computers at home.

    One PC was updated from 8.1 to 10. The "Anniversary update" and the "Creators update" each rendered a couple of programs/apps non-functional.
    One laptop was updated from 8.1 to 10 with similar results - broken programs.
    One laptop came with Win 10 installed. Default sound playback was broken by Creators update.
    Home network settings, specifically file and folder shares, were broken on all 3 machines by the Anniversary update and again by Creators update.

    Two PCs were not updated and are still running Win 8.1. Programs and network/sharing settings have NOT been broken by any updates.

    The Spring 2018 Win 10 update is now making its way into our 3 machines one at a time. If network/sharing and/or useful programs get messed up again i'll use saved system images and roll the ones i can back to 8.1. It's not that i don't like Win 10, but i'm fed up fixing the systems over and over. Besides, we don't use the many impressive features of Win 10. I sort of play with them after a big update and say "Oh, that's nice." , but then i don't find any ongoing need or desire to use them.

    Windows 8.1 with Classic Shell or Start 8 is a perfectly good operating system. One of our 8.1 PCs is in the livingroom and doubles as a DVR using Windows Media Center. We've saved a lot of $$$ by using a cable-card tuner (HD Homerun Prime stand alone box by Silicondust) connected to our router. We can watch live TV on any device in the house using the HD Homerun free app, and record on our Media Center PC for playback anywhere in the house (except HBO or Showtime movies which must be watched on the same setup as they were recorded on).

    The Win 10 PC has a pretty good graphics card for gaming. We have about 14 games on the Steam app on that PC. By opening the Steam app on that PC and on the livingroom PC we can choose In-Home Streaming which allows us to use the more powerful PC to play any game on our Steam list in the livingroom which has basic integrated graphics. There is no lag and no loss of image quality, although you do need to make a one-time adjustment to the streaming bit-rate (30Mbps provides excellent game visuals for 1080p gaming in the living room).

    Again, just sayin' that Win 8.1 is a very capable trouble-free system for a wide variety of uses, so who needs all the hassles of Win 10 updates?

  2. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to starvinmarvin For This Useful Post:

    Rick Corbett (2018-05-18),satrow (2018-05-18),Vincenzo (2018-06-24)

  3. #2
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Georgetown, TX, USA
    Posts
    30
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 4 Times in 3 Posts
    This is to echo my agreement with what you've said. I have 5 computers and all are running Windows 8.1 flawlessly.

    All have previously been upgraded to Windows 10 to get their "digital licenses", but then were returned back to their Windows 8.1 OS.

    For use as a "test bed", I keep Windows 10 on an extra hard drive for one of the machines and whenever a new build comes out I update it to check things out. This has been done through all of the Windows 10 builds. The problems I've encountered with the updates have been many; from failed installs, to failure to boot, to drivers that don't work, as well as a number of my older programs which worked with one build, but fail (forever) on the next. Each upgrade has been far less than simple.

    As with your experience, none of this happens on my Windows 8.1 machines.

    Win 8's "end of life" is to be on Jan. 10, 2023 and I'm not looking forward to the hassle of going to Windows 10 (or whatever might be its successor).

  4. #3
    4 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    514
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 54 Times in 48 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by al taylor View Post
    This is to echo my agreement with what you've said. I have 5 computers and all are running Windows 8.1 flawlessly.

    All have previously been upgraded to Windows 10 to get their "digital licenses", but then were returned back to their Windows 8.1 OS.

    For use as a "test bed", I keep Windows 10 on an extra hard drive for one of the machines and whenever a new build comes out I update it to check things out. This has been done through all of the Windows 10 builds. The problems I've encountered with the updates have been many; from failed installs, to failure to boot, to drivers that don't work, as well as a number of my older programs which worked with one build, but fail (forever) on the next. Each upgrade has been far less than simple.

    As with your experience, none of this happens on my Windows 8.1 machines.

    Win 8's "end of life" is to be on Jan. 10, 2023 and I'm not looking forward to the hassle of going to Windows 10 (or whatever might be its successor).
    Glad to hear i'm not the only one! Regarding the end-of-life issue, or maybe we should just call it end-of-support, the only real concern is security. I don't see this as a serious issue because many anti-virus/anti-maware makers cater to older versions of Windows. For example, last year i built a new PC for my girlfriend using her existing case and DVD drive while everything else was new parts. Later, i installed her old motherboard, cpu, RAM and graphics card in a spare case that had been gathering dust in the laundry room. Then i installed Windows XP so i can play a bunch of old games that ran great on Win 98 through Win XP to Win 7 but which don't run on Win 8.1 or 10. Avast and MalwareBytes both work fine on this old XP rig, and all indications are that they will continue offering XP coverage for years to come. In light of that, they'll probably do the same for Win 7 and 8/8.1.
    Luckily, my current monitor has two input jacks so it's easy to switch from the Win 10 PC to the XP system. I'm having a lot of fun with some of the old games as well as some productivity apps, too.

  5. #4
    WS Lounge VIP access-mdb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Oxfordshire, UK
    Posts
    2,024
    Thanks
    162
    Thanked 188 Times in 181 Posts
    I've had experience of 8 PCs updating and not one had a problem. YMMV as they say.
    What do you mean nothing is impossible? I've been doing nothing for years.

  6. #5
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    717
    Thanks
    73
    Thanked 98 Times in 91 Posts
    I've run Win8, 8.1 and 10, and they have all worked well for me. My installation isn't typical and I'd hesitate to draw too many conclusions from that. For one thing I'm not getting updates except at my choice and my timing. This is also a home setup and not for business use.

    One key usability factor I notice is controlling the timing of updates and administrative tasks. Few things irk me more than to have some maintenance or administrative function start up while I'm trying to be productive. IMO, this could be addressed by flipping around the current design assumptions.

    The current design seems to be based upon the idea that "all times are available for systems maintenance except for certain exceptions." I'd much prefer a regime where "assume if the computer is running, it is being used. Maintenance happens only in designated time windows OR the computer is in a low power state OR the input console is locked. When those condition cease, maintenance ceases too."

    This will mean that certain maintenance/update functions take longer, sometimes much longer, to complete. However the computer exists to serve a user and some functional purpose. The computer does not exist to update itself, or make a security wonk happy, or achieve some mythical nirvana of runtime compilation. It's a question of who and what has priority.

    I've been on both sides of the fence, both as a user and as an administrator. For me the user should get the priority here. It is a "personal computer", after all.

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to BHarder For This Useful Post:

    satrow (2018-06-07)

  8. #6
    4 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    514
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 54 Times in 48 Posts
    "...Few things irk me more than to have some maintenance or administrative function start up while I'm trying to be productive. IMO, this could be addressed by flipping around the current design assumptions."

    Windows 10 made it clear to me more than once that i can tell it to apply updates only during certain hours when i'm not using my computer. Once that is set i don't have to mess with it anymore, and i see no cause to complain in that particular regard. Rather, it's the various preferences and adjustments i've made that revert when a Windows 10 major update is applied. The most annoying of these are home networking/file and media sharing for which our settings are undone by Win 10.

  9. #7
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Polk County, Florida
    Posts
    4,019
    Thanks
    29
    Thanked 469 Times in 370 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by access-mdb View Post
    I've had experience of 8 PCs updating and not one had a problem. YMMV as they say.
    I have two PC's (both DIY, one setup as NAS) and a Dell Latitude laptop. My wife and my son each have Dell Inspiron laptops. I've never used Home Group, always WORKGROUP networking. After a major upgrade of Windows 10, I would go into Services and disable Home Group Provider and Home Group Listener; never any issues with networking.

    On occasion I would get a notice that StartIsBack ++ is incompatible. As soon as the upgrade was complete, I would reinstall StartIsBack ++, hassle free. My wife and son have no issues whatsoever.

    All machines are set for updates in quiet hours. I've never been interrupted by Windows Maintenance/Update routines. I have all the maintenance/drive imaging/Robocopy tasks that I consider important run via Task Scheduler overnight, as well.

    As Malcolm said, YMMV.
    Last edited by bbearren; 2018-06-08 at 09:38.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  10. #8
    4 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    514
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 54 Times in 48 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    I have two PC's (both DIY, one setup as NAS) and a Dell Latitude laptop. My wife and my son each have Dell Inspiron laptops. I've never used Home Group, always WORKGROUP networking. After a major upgrade of Windows 10, I would go into Services and disable Home Group Provider and Home Group Listener; never any issues with networking.

    On occasion I would get a notice that StartIsBack ++ is incompatible. As soon as the upgrade was complete, I would reinstall StartIsBack ++, hassle free. My wife and son have no issues whatsoever.

    All machines are set for updates in quiet hours. I've never been interrupted by Windows Maintenance/Update routines. I have all the maintenance/drive imaging/Robocopy tasks that I consider important run via Task Scheduler overnight, as well.

    As Malcolm said, YMMV.
    StartIsBack is a fine-looking start menu. I see the attraction, and really like a lot of their icons. The main thing, of course, is to restore a Start button and familiar menu, and StartIsBack appears to do that nicely.

    The first one we tried was Start 8, and we're very pleased with it. For $4.99 it seemed a reasonable purchase. Next we tried Classic Shell and found it to be similarly good. It's the one i'm using right now. As you can see in the screenshot there are tabs for adjusting all sorts of things, far more than i need but, hey, it's all there if we ever want to customize in a new way.
    ClassicShell for Windows 8.1.png

  11. #9
    5 Star Lounger RockE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Paducah, Kentucky
    Posts
    623
    Thanks
    54
    Thanked 108 Times in 100 Posts
    +1 for Classic Shell which I've often installed for clients who can't seem to adjust to Windows 10. However Microsoft may kill it in the future (they've bought the company).
    Clone or Image often! Backup, backup, backup, backup...
    - - - - -
    Home Built System: Windows 10 Home 64-bit, AMD Athlon II X3 435 CPU, 16GB DDR3 RAM, ASUSTeK M4A89GTD-PRO/USB3 (AM3) motherboard, 512GB SanDisk SSD, 3 TB WD HDD, 1024MB ATI AMD RADEON HD 6450 video, ASUS VE278 (1920x1080) display, ATAPI iHAS224 Optical Drive, integrated Realtek High Definition Audio

  12. #10
    4 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    514
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 54 Times in 48 Posts
    Microsoft bought Classic Shell? Oh, dear, that could spell the end for a fine, free piece of software!
    Microsoft has bought lots of smaller companies, including Skype, which itself was a fine, free and friendly video chat program used by millions all over the world. These days it's more business-oriented, and millions of users have moved on to Facebook Messenger and other similar apps.

  13. #11
    5 Star Lounger RockE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Paducah, Kentucky
    Posts
    623
    Thanks
    54
    Thanked 108 Times in 100 Posts
    Classic Shell was made open source but is apparently now on GitHub (Microsoft bought GitHub). However the Classic Shell site appears to be active again, so who knows?
    Clone or Image often! Backup, backup, backup, backup...
    - - - - -
    Home Built System: Windows 10 Home 64-bit, AMD Athlon II X3 435 CPU, 16GB DDR3 RAM, ASUSTeK M4A89GTD-PRO/USB3 (AM3) motherboard, 512GB SanDisk SSD, 3 TB WD HDD, 1024MB ATI AMD RADEON HD 6450 video, ASUS VE278 (1920x1080) display, ATAPI iHAS224 Optical Drive, integrated Realtek High Definition Audio

  14. #12
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    St Louis, Missouri, USA
    Posts
    24,224
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 1,184 Times in 1,037 Posts
    Just because Microsoft bought GitHub does NOT mean they are going to exert control over the content. Public content will remain managed as it has been. Private content will remain private. Check out Reddit AMA with Nat Friedman about GitHub. It may answer some questions and uneasiness about the acquisition. Then again, it may not.
    Joe

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •