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  1. #16
    Administrator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Here's a link to a 'Best of 2018' review article that gives more info about Powerline networks and explains the different standards. For video streaming I suggest you use AV1200 or better.

    PS - Although it's supposedly a 'standard', you may perhaps have problems connecting EOL adapters from different manufacturers, despite what the article says.

    From my own bitter experience (and much trudging backwards and forwards, returning different EOP adapters to different shops), that's when I found at the time that it wasn't such a standard after all...

    However, that experience was 4 years ago so it's more than likely that the situation between different manufacturers has improved.

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  3. #17
    Gold Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    The wireless option (I did not see that ) may be the best bet as the throughput can be better than the 100 Mb Ethernet port. Have you installed the latest firmware for them? version M24.R.0222 seems to address stability issues.

    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

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  5. #18
    Administrator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wavy
    The wireless option (I did not see that ) may be the best bet as the throughput can be better than the 100 Mb Ethernet port.
    The BDP-S3500 Operating Instructions (page 36) suggest that the Blu-Ray player's Ethernet adapter has more than enough capacity for HD video:
    The Recommended connection speed is of at least 2.5 Mbps for standard definition video (10 Mbps for high definition video).

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  7. #19
    Gold Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    Ok you are right for regular HD , I was remembering the specs for HDMI cables for which the current 2.0 spec is 18 Gbps. But that would be uncompressed data perhaps so the reqs would be higher. BTW Netflix does say
    Internet Connection Speed Recommendations

    Below are the internet download speed recommendations per stream for playing TV shows and movies through Netflix.
    0.5 Megabits per second - Required broadband connection speed
    1.5 Megabits per second - Recommended broadband connection speed
    3.0 Megabits per second - Recommended for SD quality
    5.0 Megabits per second - Recommended for HD quality
    25 Megabits per second - Recommended for Ultra HD quality
    Watching Altered Carbon in 4K HDR I see ~15 Mbps used. BTW that is one heck of a good SciFi series.
    In any event I think either solution for will work for his equipment.
    Last edited by wavy; 2018-08-14 at 08:53. Reason: changed 2.1 to 2.0
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  8. #20
    5 Star Lounger Vincenzo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Corbett View Post
    (EOP adapters with Wi-Fi can sometimes be a little more complicated to setup using wireless but, once this is done, any wireless devices can move seamlessly between router and individual EOP adapters. .
    Rick,

    Are you saying that the EOP adapters can create an extended wifi network with the same name and encryption key as the router, and that you can move through the house switching between them seamlessly?

    At Bestbuy I was told that to do that I needed to buy a new router and adapters with "mesh" capability.

    If so, can you recommend a model that you've used for this?

    Thanks
    Last edited by Vincenzo; 2018-08-15 at 15:41.

  9. #21
    Administrator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vincenzo
    Are you saying that the EOP adapters can create an extended wifi network with the same name and login as the router, and that you can move through the house switching between them seamlessly?

    At Bestbuy I was told that to do that I needed to buy a new router and adapters with "mesh" capability.

    If so, can you recommend a model that you've used for this?
    Yes, I've done it years ago using a BT 500 base device plugged into the ISP-supplied router and four BT 500 EOPs on both floors of a friend's house connecting multiple smart phones, tablets, smart TVs and wireless printers. This way the smart phones and tablets were free to roam and just connected into the strongest Wi-Fi signal automatically... no 'mesh router' needed at all.

    (The only issue has been when the family come together in their kitchen/diner and there can be 5 phones and sometimes one or two tablets as well, all using the EOP's Wi-Fi. Over a period of time the amount of Wi-Fi traffic appears to overload the tiny memory buffer in the BT500 devices. However, a simple power cycle of the EOP clears the buffer and all's well again for several more months. I have no idea whether this issue is limited to BT 500 EOPs... more modern equipment is likely to have larger buffers.)

    It just means that each EOP needs to have the same SSID and password as the wireless router. (At the time it was a pain because the default IP Gateway address on the router, BT EOPs and TP-Link EOPs were all different, i.e. 192.168.0.1, 192.168.1.1 and 192.168.2.1.)

    I think the BT 500 has been superceded by the BT 600 - have a look at the article I referenced earlier.

    I can't recommend a recent make/model of EOP because I haven't done this for years. However, whilst looking at the specifications for the TP-Link range of Wi-Fi-enabled EOPs I noticed that their setup now includes a method to copy the router SSID and password automatically in order to create a seamless Wi-Fi network. For example, from the TP-Link TL-WPA8630 specifications:

    Wi-Fi Clone – Automatically copies the network name (SSID) and password of your router with the touch of the Wi-Fi clone button
    (I note that it doesn't mention gateway settings. I think the assumption is that you'll be using a TP-Link router. )

    Hope this helps...

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  11. #22
    5 Star Lounger Vincenzo's Avatar
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    OK thanks, I will look into that. I need to get a stronger wifi signal out to my front door to accommodate a Ring Video doorbell. It would be nice if I could get an extender that will clone the existing network.

  12. #23
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    Powerline extenders do exactly that - clone the existing.

    cheers, Paul

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