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  1. #1
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    newbie TP-Link question

    I have a lan-connected laptop, and 2 non-smart tvs that are wirelessly connected via Samsung Bluray players.

    I have heard that something like TP-Link could be used to have these Bluray players connected as if the were connected by a lan.

    I don't have a clue as to how that might be done. Can anyone help me understand what needs to be done to accomplish that?

    The laptop is on my 1st floor. One tv is below that floor in my family room. The other tv is above that floor in my living room.

    Thank you for any help,
    Dick

  2. #2
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    What is it that you want to do with the players?

    cheers, Paul

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    I would like them to act like they are connected to a lan, like the TV's and laptop, without having to run any more ethernet cables.

    Lately, when trying to watch a movie on Amazon or Netflix, I'll get a message saying there isn't enough bandwidth to continue. Last night the message was that the movie was "too big to continue" being shown.

    So, I would like to watch movies through my players w/o the error messages.

    Thank you,
    Dick

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    As in "put a DVD in the player" or "stream via the player"?

    What model is the player?

    cheers, Paul

  5. #5
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    Thanks for helping me Paul:
    "stream via the player"

    BDP-S3500

    Dick

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    Do you don't currently use the players via DLNA or the web browser?
    I expect the players would need to be Netflix compatible to be able to play that content, so your only option would be to use a PC to play the movie and re-stream it as DNLA, or mirror cast.

    cheers, Paul

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    Sorry Paul. I don't know what DLNA is . I currently use the player by means of wifi. As my initial post tries to describe it, my problem is the intermittent error messages I get when watching a movie this way. I was hoping to find out how to use a product called TP-Link to "fake out" the player so it thinks that it's attached via a cable, by using the product plugged in to my existing home wiring.
    Dick

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    I don't think the issue is with the wireless connection, unless you have very heavily utilized wireless. More likely the internet is just slow that day.
    To be sure, check what is using wifi when you get those errors.

    cheers, Paul

  9. #9
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    Thanks Paul. I guess I was hoping someone here might be using the TP-Link product to do what I want to do; and could therefore help me do the same with my setup.

    Best,
    Dick

  10. #10
    Gold Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    BDP-S3500
    That would seem to be a SONY not Samsung as stated. I have been trying to follow this but I still have no idea how you have things connected now or what it is you think you might want to do.
    Also what Tp Link product are you thinking of?
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  11. #11
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    David:
    https://www.tp-link.com/us/

    I have a laptop & 2 non-smart TV's. Each is separately connected via cables. Each TV has a blu-ray player attached to it. The PC has a modem and a router. The blu-ray players connect wirelessly when I want to watch a movie through Amazon Prime or Netflix.

    Because of the intermittent error messages I have been getting while watching a movie wirelessly, I thought it would be possible to use TP-Link products to have my home wiring act as if they were a LAN cable.

    I started this thread because I know less than zero about networking, and was hoping someone here may have used TP-Link to do something like what I'm trying to do - and could therefore help me.

    I'm sorry that I haven't described things clearly enough. I hope this response does a better job.

    If not, please let me know how to better describe what you need to understand my set-up, and what I'm trying to do.

    Dick

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    Gold Lounger wavy's Avatar
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    Ok powerline adapters! Looks like it would work if your br player has an ethernet connection. The model you posted does not seem to, but check. If it is only wireless you would need a wireless router or switch to send the signal at the player end. seems like it might be better trying to get a better signal from the base router. you can install a wireless analyzer on your smart phone. I use WiFi Analyzer. This will allow you to see if there are any competing signals @ the wavelength you router is using. You may be able to tell it to use a different frequency. Note 2.4 GHz has greater range than 5 but 5 is a faster protocol.
    David

    Just because you don't know where you are going doesn't mean any road will get you there.

  13. #13
    Administrator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dick-Y
    I have a laptop & 2 non-smart TV's. Each is separately connected via cables. Each TV has a blu-ray player attached to it. The PC has a modem and a router. The blu-ray players connect wirelessly when I want to watch a movie through Amazon Prime or Netflix.

    Because of the intermittent error messages I have been getting while watching a movie wirelessly, I thought it would be possible to use TP-Link products to have my home wiring act as if they were a LAN cable.
    Your last post describes both a laptop and a PC but your first post mentions just a laptop. It sounds like your Sony BDP-S3500 Blu-Ray players's are currently connecting wirelessly to your router in order to access Netflix. So, a network diagram of your current setup would look something like this:

    current network diagram.jpg
    Click to enlarge

    From what I understand, the wireless network connection between your router and the Blu-Ray players is weak because of the distance between them on different floors.

    To improve the connection, you are wondering whether you can use EOP ('Ethernet Over Power' aka Powerline or HomePlug) adapters, either as wireless range extenders or to provide a hard-wired Ethernet link.

    The Operating Instructions for your Sony BDP-S3500 Blu-Ray player shows a LAN connection is available on the rear so, in theory, you may not need wireless at all.

    blu-ray rear panel.jpg
    Click to enlarge

    A revised network diagram would look like this (with dotted lines representing electrical cabling):

    revised network diagram.jpg
    Click to enlarge

    My experience of EOP adapters is that, when they work, they work very well indeed. In fact, 4 years after installing multiple EOP adapters in a friend's house they continue to provide excellent connection speed (both wired and wireless) over her home electrical supply. However, my experience with TP-Link EOP adapters at the time was poor and I ended up returning them and buying alternative EOP adapters instead. (I had an even worse experience with Devolo EOP adapters... but that's another story.)

    YMMV... it depends on both your electrical circuitry and the EOP make/model, of which there are several. Wherever you buy the EOP adapters from, make sure you can take them back if they don't work with your setup.

    Hope this helps...

    (Edit: FYI, I used the free draw.io service to create the network diagrams.)

  14. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Rick Corbett For This Useful Post:

    Dick-Y (2018-08-13),satrow (2018-08-13),Vincenzo (2018-08-15),wavy (2018-08-13)

  15. #14
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    Rick:
    Thank you!
    Dick
    PS,
    I'll be going to Best Buy tomorrow morning to the necessary EOP adapters; and I'll make sure they are returnable if they don't work correctly for me. I'll also post my results when I am satisfactorily up and running.

  16. #15
    Administrator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dick-Y
    I'll be going to Best Buy tomorrow morning to the necessary EOP adapters; and I'll make sure they are returnable if they don't work correctly for me. I'll also post my results when I am satisfactorily up and running.
    Don't forget:
    1. You'll also need 3 (short) LAN cables.
    2. EOP adapters must be plugged directly into power sockets; they don't work if plugged into power cable extenders.
    3. A lot of EOP adapters these days include a wireless access point as standard as well as the Ethernet port... so you also get a boost if you use smartphones, tablets, etc.

    For example, using the link you provided earlier, there's a basic (LAN-only) Powerline adapter and the same Powerline adapter with Wi-Fi.

    (EOP adapters with Wi-Fi can sometimes be a little more complicated to setup using wireless but, once this is done, any wireless devices can move seamlessly between router and individual EOP adapters. All the EOP manufacturers seem to have made great improvements in their control software in the last few years to make it far easier to setup wireless connectivity. I was looking at a friend's TP-Link EOP adapters a few weeks ago - provided as part of her ISP's broadband package - and was impressed.)

    Hope this helps...

  17. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Rick Corbett For This Useful Post:

    Dick-Y (2018-08-13),Vincenzo (2018-08-16)

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