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  1. #1
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    Very high WiFi usage

    For several years I only use about 60 to 80 Gigabytes per month. Suddenly last month it jumped to 1175 to Gigabytes. I run Malaware bytes and an antivirus software without finding any compromise in my network.
    How can I determine what has been using so much WiFi?
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Administrator satrow's Avatar
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    Wifi only, not connecting via a router/modem?

    Check the amount of any Windows or MS (Office?) Updates in the last month, check also for failed (esp. repeatedly) updates. Check modem/router stats for FEC/HEC errors or Wifi errors/collisions.

    Which Windows version?

  3. #3
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    The only way I know of is to catch the offending program while it is active. And the best tool I know of to do that, which is standard on every Windows PC, is Resource Monitor.

    Follow this command sequence (I'm assuming Windows 7 or XP. Simply search for Resource Monitor if Win8 or higher):

    Start | All Programs | Accessories | System Tools | Resource Monitor | UAC: OK | Network Tab

    Now the fun begins! If the culprit is running, your green "oscilloscope" displays on the right will be showing a LOT of activity. There are 4 collapsible detail windows on the left:

    1). Processes With Network Activity
    2). Network Activity
    3). TCP Connections
    4). Listening Ports

    The first two are the most useful, and you should start with #1. Pay attention to the Total (Bytes/Sec) column. You can sort any column by simply clicking on the heading, so do that with this column. Click once to sort in Ascending order, twice to sort in Descending order (you want Descending, basically now and forever in this window). The arrow tells you the current sort order.

    Once you've gotten that far, look to the Send and Receive columns. If normal computer patterns and rules apply, you'll probably find that you are receiving a lot more data than you are sending. That's an artifact of patches, updates, web browsing, all the usual stuff.

    So what program is the culprit? That's in the Image column. Unfortunately "Image" is Resource Monitor language for "the program name", rather than a better description. Description columns are available in numerous Resource Monitor views but not this one. You have to make do with the Image name in this case.

    Good luck and Happy Hunting!
    Last edited by BHarder; 2018-10-02 at 16:30. Reason: Minor clarifications

  4. #4
    2 Star Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by des9516 View Post
    For several years I only use about 60 to 80 Gigabytes per month. Suddenly last month it jumped to 1175 to Gigabytes. I run Malaware bytes and an antivirus software without finding any compromise in my network.
    How can I determine what has been using so much WiFi?
    Thanks
    Is it possible you have someone "borrowing" bandwidth from you? I don't think Malwarebytes or any AV products are going to tell you that someone is connecting to your WiFi. If your router supports it, you might try enabling MAC filtering and only allowing known devices (by MAC address) to connect to your network.

    Rob

  5. #5
    WS Lounge VIP Lugh's Avatar
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    I suspect same as Rob in post #4. In addition to MAC filtering [assuming router]:

    1. Have you changed the router password from the default? If not, anyone with basic knowledge could leech off your connection.

    2. See if you can make your router invisible via its admin interface. This makes it disappear from the list of available connections in your immediate neighborhood—so if you get a new device or a visitor, you'll need to make it visible again while they authenticate and connect, and then change back to invisible.
    Lugh.
    ~
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    i7-7700; GeForce GTX 1060; 16GB DDR4 2400; 2 x 256G SSD, 4TB HD

  6. #6
    3 Star Lounger
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    Your router will show you who is connected (and who has been recently, probably) - do you recognise all the devices?

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