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Thread: Dell Vostro 430

  1. #16
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldguy99 View Post
    Hope you don't mind me piggybacking on this thread but I have a Vostro 430 and you guys might know the answer.
    It's an i7, 64bit Win7, with 2 sticks of 2Gb RAM.
    I'd like to add 2x4Gb sticks to have a total of 12 Gb.
    The Dell table I've seen only shows it upgradeable to 4x 2Gb for an 8Gb install, or 6 and 16 Gb installs, but none of 12.
    Do you think it should work with my original 2x2Gb if I add 2 sticks of 4Gb?
    Thanks
    Let me know if I should just start a new thread - but the Vostro 430 is long out of date now!

    OldGuy:

    Here is where you can find the specs on your Vostro:

    https://downloads.dell.com/manuals/a...uide_en-us.pdf

    As for memory, here's what can go in your computer:

    Memory module connector 4 DIMM slots
    Memory module capacity 1 GB, 2 GB, or 4 GB
    Type 1066 MHz, 1333 MHz DDR3
    Minimum memory 1 GB
    Maximum memory 16 GB

    I'm not sure if you can mix and match the memory, or if it all has to be the same. My guess is that you have to have matching pairs, but that all four sticks don't have to match. Therefore, I'm pretty sure that you could add 2x4GB sticks to your current 2x2GB sticks, resulting in a total of 12 GB of RAM. You'll need to add 2x4GB anyway, if you want to get anywhere in the neighborhood of 12 GB total, so in my view it is worth a try.

    You can install either 1066 MHz or 1333 MHz memory; if you mix and match, my thought is that the computer would step down to the slower speed; but I'm pretty sure that that would be the only bad effect. In other words, you can probably mix and match on the speed as well. But if you know what speed you currently have, I would go with that same speed for the additional memory, just to make sure.

    By the way, the fact that you can go up to 16 GB on memory is a clear indicator that you have a 64-bit computer, not a 32-bit computer. This means that you can (and should) install a 64-bit operating system, such as 64-bit Windows or 64-bit Linux. it also means that you have an up-to-date, modern computer, able to handle large tasks if you install the maximum amount of memory (i.e. 16 GB).

    Jim
    Last edited by mrjimphelps; 2019-01-07 at 11:34.

  2. #17
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    Upgrade to 12Mb all worked fine with secondhand Crucial - they don't do the 4GB modules any more
    Next step add an SSD.
    Thanks!

  3. #18
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldguy99 View Post
    Upgrade to 12Mb all worked fine with secondhand Crucial
    I've bought second-hand memory on Ebay - it's really cheap, and if you get bad memory, you didn't lose much because of the cheap price.

  4. #19
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    There is one other thing you should consider doing -- get a PS/2 keyboard and mouse.

    Your computer has PS/2 keyboard and mouse ports (therefore it's not as modern as I suggested earlier!). This means that you can connect a PS/2 keyboard and mouse.

    Normally this is no big deal. But if USB ever goes out on your computer, the only way you will be able to work is if you connect a PS/2 keyboard and mouse.

    In my lifetime I have had two computers where USB died. Both of those computers had PS/2 keyboard and mouse ports, so it was an easy fix to get back up and running without any USB functionality; but if I had not had PS/2 keyboard and mouse capability, it might have been a very difficult fix.

    You probably know what I mean by "PS/2 keyboard and mouse". In case you don't, here's what I'm talking about:

    PS/2 keyboard:
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004XBLDZS..._t1_B01BV7RQ5C

    PS/2 mouse:
    https://www.amazon.com/Logitech-M-SB...A5ZV2M30K9EKJK

    Note that in each case the plug is round, not flat and rectangular. Also, the computer needs to be off when a PS/2 keyboard or mouse is plugged in or unplugged -- if you follow that rule, PS/2 ALWAYS works.

    Every computer technician should have a PS/2 keyboard and mouse in his tool bag. I also have a serial mouse in my tool bag - it bailed me out a few weeks ago with a computer that had a serial port, and where the USB mouse didn't work for some reason (I don't recall why). I was doing a clean Windows 10 install on a Dell OptiPlex 3020M, and it had a serial port (but no PS/2 ports).
    Last edited by mrjimphelps; 2019-01-11 at 09:21.

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